Winter Solstice Restorative Yoga | Yoga with Melissa 512

published 1 month ago by Dr. Melissa West - Yoga Teacher - Namaste Yoga

Restorative Yoga Winter solstice occurs between December 20 and 22nd in the Northern hemisphere and June the 20 and 22nd in the Southern hemisphere. It represents the shortest day and the longest night of the year. Here we sink into the depths of darkness and most likely tiredness envelopes us. It is a perfect time of year to practice the rejuvenating restorative style of yoga. In this class we will focus on restorative yoga poses with props to renew our energy when the darkness and cold of winter envelopes us completely. Legs up the wall, restorative child’s pose, supported bridge pose and supported locust pose with draw your energy back into your kidney and adrenals, leaving your feeling refreshed and rejuvenated and ready to welcome the slow return of the light. Props Needed: wall, 2 blocks, a bolster, eye pillow and blankets for this restorative yoga class for winter solstice. Winter solstice occurs between December 20 and 22nd in the Northern hemisphere and June the 20 and 22nd in the Southern hemisphere. It represents the shortest day and the longest night of the year. Here we sink into the depths of darkness and most likely tiredness envelopes us. It is a perfect time of year to practice the rejuvenating restorative style of yoga. Winter solstice is a time to mirror the stillness and quietude of the dormant earth. All of nature is resting and hibernating and inviting us to do the same. This is a time for us to be patient and wait for the slow build towards the brighter days of spring that will come later. Now is the time to rest and conserve our energy. When we turn inwards we can connect with our inner silence, inner wisdom and listen for the blessings and guidance that are available through deep rest. In this restorative yoga class for winter solstice we will surrender to the mystery of the darkness. The darkness all around you will support you in exploring your inner world. In the depth of this long night there is space for your intuition, inner wisdom, and creative potential to be born again. However, it is important that we rest in the frozen silence and stark stillness without rushing on to the next big thing. This is the time to go inside, BEFORE, stepping out into the world again. It is only possible to make the descent into the darkness when you commit to stillness and quiet. Only you will know what that looks like for you. Perhaps it is time in meditation, yoga, quiet contemplation, long walks on the barren paths of the forest, breaks from social media, letting go of social engagements, embracing naps and downtime. However, it is only through deep rest that authentic healing and rejuvenation can be accessed. If this class resonated with you, you may be interested in our Five Element Theory Course on Water Element: Water Element Course Water element invites us inward towards rest. Although it is the most yin of all the elements, it is also highly adaptable. Water can be as deep and still as an ocean, the roaring rapids of a river, a babbling brook, or a meandering river. It is the season of winter, where we wait in the bareness of the season in hibernation. As we grow inward to the most yin, quiet and still time of year we begin to confront issues of safety. If our capacity to discern safety is unreliable we will drain our adrenals and lose our sense of vitality keeping us in a constantly anxious feedback loop. It becomes difficult to sink comfortably into ourselves. Fear in our contemporary culture looks like: Do I have enough? Is my future secure? Am I safe? Can I trust? Fear of failure. Fear of what others think of me. Fear of disappointing others. Fear of not keeping up. Water element is related to the sense of hearing. However, listening is a skill. It requires attention, concentration and discernment to derive meaning from what we hear. In this course we will listen deeply to each other and to the source of our deep intuition and inner wisdom.

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